Kees de Hoogh

Kees is an environmental exposure scientist and assistant professor working at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland. He specialises in spatial modelling and exposure assessment for studies on environment and health. His recent focus involves cutting edge fine resolution spatio-temporal modelling to derive refined exposures using satellite and ancillary data. He has been involved in a number of large projects (BioSHARE, ESCAPE, ELAPSE) where he co-led the air pollution exposure assessment, and currently is a co-PI of the EXPANSE and PI of MOBI-AIR studies.

Publications

Evaluation of different methods and data sources to optimise modelling of NO2 at a global scale

Lua M, Schmitz O, de Hoog K, Kaid Q, Karssenberg D.
Environment International Volume 142, September 2020, 105856

Predicting Fine-Scale Daily NO 2 for 2005-2016 Incorporating OMI Satellite Data Across Switzerland

de Hoogh K, Saucy A, Shtein A, Schwartz J, West E, Strassmann A, Puhan M, Röösli M , Stafoggia M, Kloog I
Environ Sci Technol . 2019 Sep 3;53(17):10279-10287. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.9b03107. Epub 2019 Aug 15.

Air Pollution, Lung Function and COPD: Results From the Population-Based UK Biobank Study

Doiron D, de Hoogh K, Probst-Hensch N, Fortier I , Cai Y , De Matteis S, Hansell AL.
Eur Respir J . 2019 Jul 25;54(1):1802140. doi: 10.1183/13993003.02140-2018. Print 2019 Jul.

Spatial PM2.5, NO2, O3 and BC models for Western Europe – Evaluation of spatiotemporal stability

de Hoog K, Chenc J, Gulliverd J, Hoffmann B, Hertel O, Ketzel M, Bauwelinck M, van Donkelaar A, Hvidtfeldt UA, Katsouyann K, Klompmaker J, Martin RV, Samoli E, Schwart PE, Stafoggia M, Bellander T, Strak M, Wolf K, Hoek G.
Environment International Volume 120, November 2018, Pages 81-92

Our ultimate goal is that people live healthily for longer

Our ultimate goal is that people live healthily for longer

We know far less about the exposome than we do about the human genome. So far, we only understand about half of the disease burden for which we know the environment plays a role. If we want to prevent people from becoming ill, then we need to understand the other half too. We therefore want to systematically analyse the exposome for the first time. We will start with research into the causes of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The techniques and insights from this research will also be applicable to other chronic conditions.

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